Sunday, December 13, 2009

Why do so many christians claim that outsiders believe in their god but are "suppressing the truth"?

     It's not as though anyone has ever presented any evidence of the christian god. To me, it looks like a snow job. It is most likely that there is no being corresponding to the christian god. Next is the possibility that there is such a being, but that he is a fraud. It is incredibly unlikely that the character described is as described as such a being (who supposedly desires that we know him) could easily make himself known.

5 comments:

冷冷 said...
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dorisblaney0102 said...
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Penn Tomassetti said...

You ask some good questions. Do you really want the answers when you ask, though? (I don't mean to be rhetorical, but I do wonder.)

Pvblivs said...

Penn:

     Well, I would like answers. I don't see any forthcoming, but it would be nice.

Penn Tomassetti said...

It's been quite some time since I asked you that. But recently I've been on Atheist Central and thought of you.

It really makes a difference whether or not one has a desire to resolve a question.

You asked why Christians claim outsiders believe in our God but suppress the truth? Well the simplest answer is that the Bible says all people (not just those outside the Christian religion) suppress the truth in unrighteousness (Romans 1:18). From my perspective, the question in your title requires a theological answer. From your perspective, or from others outside my faith, a theological answer may not be expected.

I could explain it like this briefly. We all suppress truth in our minds. That's why we lie, or more obvious, why we often deny our own mistakes or faults. On a larger scale, the evidence is there for us in nature pointing to a supernaturally intelligent Being, but we suppress the knowledge of this Being in our unrighteousness (think denying, lying and taking advantage of others).

That's only the beginning of the theological answer, however. It ends in a message about restoration to righteousness (or uprightness) and peace with our Maker, but not through our own means, rather as a gift from the Creator to the creatures.

I hope you realize I'm only trying to help or at least provide food for thought.

Thanks,
Penn